Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Dead at 87 of Cancer

Updated: 2020-09-19 01:45:04

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, a member of the court’s liberal wing, died at 87, according to the Supreme Court. She died from complications from pancreatic cancer.

Ginsburg had dealt with a number of health issues in recent months, having been hospitalized for various issues several times.

The court wrote that she died on Friday evening “surrounded by her family at her home in Washington D.C.,” adding that she is survived by two children.

“Our Nation has lost a jurist of historic stature. We at the Supreme Court have lost a cherished colleague,” Chief Justice John Roberts said of Ginsburg. “Today, we mourn, but with confidence that future generations will remember Ruth Bader Ginsburg as we knew her—a tireless and resolute champion of justice.”

A private service for Ginsburg will be held at Arlington National Ceremony in Virginia, the court wrote.

Ginsburg was appointed to the court in 1993 by former President Bill Clinton, serving around 27 years.

Ginsburg dictated a statement to her granddaughter Clara Spera while on her deathbed: “My most fervent wish is that I will not be replaced until a new president is installed,” reported NPR. It’s not clear if that means until after the November election is over or if President Donald Trump is reelected and leaves office in 2025.

Ginsburg’s death now gives Republicans and Trump to add more conservative judges to the Supreme Court with another Trump appointment, giving conservatives a 6-to-3 majority.

supreme court justice Ruth Ginsberg
U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg at the Supreme Court building in Washington on June 1, 2017. (Jonathan Ernst/Reuters)

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) has said that he would fill the Supreme Court slot no matter the situation.

Ginsburg spent her final years on the bench as the unquestioned leader of the court’s left-wing and became something of a rock star to her admirers. Young women especially seemed to embrace her, calling her the “Notorious RBG” on Twitter.

Her health issues included five bouts with cancer beginning in 1999, falls that resulted in broken ribs, insertion of a stent to clear a blocked artery, and other hospitalizations after she turned 75.

She resisted calls by some liberals to retire during former President Barack Obama’s presidency at a time when Democrats held the Senate and a replacement with similar views could have been confirmed.

According to the White House, Trump last week announced his picks for the Supreme Court.

The candidates on the list (see the end of this article) would uphold the Constitution if approved, Trump said, adding, “The 20 additions I am announcing today would be jurists in the mold of Justices Antonin Scalia, Clarence Thomas, and Samuel Alito.”

Bridget Shelton Bade of Arizona, U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit
Daniel Cameron, Kentucky attorney general
Paul Clement of Virginia, former U.S. solicitor general
Sen. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.)
Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas)
Stuart Kyle Duncan of Louisiana, U.S. Court of Appeals for the 5th Circuit
Steven Engel of Washington, assistant attorney general
Noel Francisco of New York, former U.S. solicitor general
Sen. Josh Hawley (R-Mo.)
James Ho of Texas, U.S. Court of Appeals for the 5th Circuit
Gregory Katsas of Virginia, District of Columbia Court of Appeals
Barbara Lagoa of Florida, U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit
Christopher Landau of Maryland, U.S. ambassador to Mexico
Carlos Muñiz of Florida, Supreme Court of Florida
Martha Pacold of Illinois, District Court for the Northern District of Illinois
Peter Phipps of Pennsylvania, U.S. Court of Appeals for the 3rd Circuit
Sarah Pitlyk of Missouri, District Court for the Eastern District of Missouri
Allison Jones Rushing of North Carolina, U.S. Court of Appeals for the 4th Circuit
Kate Todd of Virginia, deputy assistant to the president
Lawrence VanDyke of Nevada, U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit

The list before the additions:

Amy Coney Barrett of Indiana, U.S. Court of Appeals for the 7th Circuit
Keith Blackwell of Georgia, Supreme Court of Georgia
Charles Canady of Florida, Supreme Court of Florida
Steven Colloton of Iowa, U.S. Court of Appeals for the 8th Circuit
Allison Eid of Colorado, U.S. Court of Appeals for the 10th Circuit
Britt Grant of Georgia, U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit
Raymond Gruender of Missouri, U.S. Court of Appeals for the 8th Circuit
Thomas Hardiman of Pennsylvania, U.S. Court of Appeals for the 3rd Circuit
Raymond Kethledge of Michigan, U.S. Court of Appeals for the 6th Circuit
Joan Larsen of Michigan, U.S. Court of Appeals for the 6th Circuit
Sen. Mike Lee (R-Utah)
Thomas Lee of Utah, Supreme Court of Utah
Edward Mansfield of Iowa, Supreme Court of Iowa
Federico Moreno of Florida, U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Florida
Kevin Newsom of Alabama, U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit
William Pryor Jr. of Alabama, U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit
Margaret Ryan of Virginia, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces
David Stras of Minnesota, U.S. Court of Appeals for the 8th Circuit
Diane Sykes of Wisconsin, U.S. Court of Appeals for the 7th Circuit
Amul Thapar of Kentucky, U.S. Court of Appeals for the 6th Circuit
Timothy Tymkovich of Colorado, U.S. Court of Appeals for the 10th Circuit
Robert Young of Michigan, Supreme Court of Michigan (retired)
Don Willett of Texas, U.S. Court of Appeals for the 5th Circuit
Patrick Wyrick of Oklahoma, U.S. District Court for the Western District of Oklahoma

Zachary Stieber and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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