The Case Against Facebook

Updated: 2020-12-17 20:03:03
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WASHINGTON, DC - JULY 29: Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies before the House Judiciary Subcommittee on Antitrust, Commercial and Administrative Law on Online Platforms and Market Power in the Rayburn House office Building, July 29, 2020 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. (Photo by Mandel Ngan-Pool/Getty Images)

WASHINGTON, DC - JULY 29: Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies before the House Judiciary Subcommittee on Antitrust, Commercial and Administrative Law on Online Platforms and Market Power in the Rayburn House office Building, July 29, 2020 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. (Photo by Mandel Ngan-Pool/Getty Images)

Last week, the federal government and attorneys general from 46 states filed one of the biggest antitrust cases in American history.

They accused Facebook of using its power and money to squash competition — in large part by buying out its competitors. The antitrust case focuses on two big acquisitions in particular: Instagram and WhatsApp.

The government argues that Facebook's acquisitions of Instagram and WhatsApp were illegal, and that Facebook should be forced to sell the companies off.

Today on the show, we dive into the case against Facebook, and try to figure out why so many politicians and government lawyers — who can't seem to agree on anything else — all agree that the government should break up Facebook.

Music: "Cowboy Hero" and "Numbers Game."

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