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We know his rhetoric has been described as boundary-breaking when it comes to race. But U.S. presidents have been enacting racist policies forever. So as President Trump wraps up his first (and maybe only) term in office, we're asking: In terms of racism, how does he stack up to others when it comes to both words and deeds?
HuffPost reporter Molly Redden explains how a program trying to reduce school absences produced unintended consequences—both for California families and Harris herself.
In Locking Up Our Own, James Forman Jr. explains the role that Black leaders, from prosecutors to legislators, have played in mass incarceration—and why it's more complicated than meets the eye.
The VP candidate's biography and heritage allow people to project all kinds of ideas onto her, and to see what they want to see. But Kamala Harris's identity is a very important lens into not just her own politics, but also Black politics around crime and punishment more broadly.
Why are hip-hop and mass incarceration so entangled in the U.S.? That's the question that our play cousins at NPR Music, Sidney Madden and Rodney Carmichael, set out to answer on their brand new podcast, Louder Than a Riot.
On this week's episode of Code Switch, we talk about the relevance of a 200 year old treaty — one that most Americans don't know that much about, but should. It's a treaty that led to the Trail of Tears, but also secured a tenuous promise.
Fall is the time for glossy fashion magazines, full of dazzling looks and the seasons hottest looks. But this year, we noticed something unusual: The covers of a bunch of major magazines fashion magazines featured Black folks. So we called up fashion critic Robin Givhan to talk about fashion's racial reckoning...and how long before it goes out of style.
Suffice it to say, we use the term "POC" a lot on Code Switch. But critiques of the initialism — and the popularization of the term "BIPOC" — caused us to ask: Should we retire POC? Or is there use in it yet?
Since 2016, journalist Yvonne Latty has been documenting her mother's journey with Alzheimer's. As part of a collaboration with Latino USA and Black Public Media, she brings us this intimate portrait.
This week, Code Switch is talking about the books that are getting us through the pandemic. Today's conversation is with Kwana Jackson, author of a romance that doesn't leave real life behind.
This week, Code Switch is talking about our favorite pandemic reads. Today's conversation is with author Elisabeth Thomas, about her fictional cult-like college, set deep in the woods of Pennsylvania.
This week, Code Switch is talking about the books that are getting us through the pandemic. Today's conversation is with Talia Hibbert, who's written a classic romance with a modern twist.
This week, Code Switch is talking about the books that are getting us through the pandemic. Today's conversation is with Silvia Moreno-Garcia, author of the creepy and engrossing Mexican Gothic.
The Code Switch team has been mired in a months-long debate that we're attempting to settle once and for all: What kind of books are best to read during this pandemic? Books that connect you to our current reality? Or ones that help you escape it?
Adults often find it really hard to talk about race. But kids? Maybe not so much. NPR received more than 2,000 entries in this year's Student Podcast Challenge, and we heard from young people all over the country about how they're thinking about race and identity in these trying times.
The wildcat strike was unprecedented for the NBA — but the world of professional basketball is no stranger to protesting for Black lives.
Matilda Crawford. Sallie Bell. Carrie Jones. Dora Jones. Orphelia Turner. Sarah A. Collier. In 1881, these six Black women brought the city of Atlanta to a complete standstill by going on strike. The strategies they used in their fight for better working conditions have implications for future generations of organizers — and resonances with the professional sports strikes happening today.
The murder of Emmett Till 65 years ago this week became a catalyst for the civil rights movement. Radio Diaries tells a lesser-known story of a Black man killed in a nearby town three months later.
In her new book, writer Vicky Osterweil argues that looting is a powerful tool to bring about real, lasting change in society.
How was the the richest and most powerful country in the world laid low by a virus only nanometers in size? Ed Yong, a science reporter for The Atlantic, says it's the inequities that have been with us for generations that made our body politic such opportunistic targets.

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